What's Happening‎ > ‎

More commentary on Divine Worship from afar

posted Nov 12, 2013, 5:15 PM by Rochester Ordinariate   [ updated Nov 13, 2013, 5:38 AM ]
I notice that our friend, Prof. Tighe, has advertised this series on Divine Worship far and wide.
I hope this will prompt further discussion of our newly approved Use among the Ordinariate groups, which is so important to our religious life.  I would also like to thank our other online friends Deborah, and Fr. Chadwick for also linking to this series.

Prof. Tighe also brings attention to a series by Joshua, given from another point of view (which I appreciated quite a bit), 

as well as makes a comment about the revised Use:

My own one regret is that no thought was taken to restoring to the Prayer of Humble Access a phrase found in the 1549 original version, but omitted in 1552 and all later versions:

We do not presume to come to this thy Table, O merciful Lord, trusting in our own righteousness, but in thy manifold and great mercies. We are not worthy so much as to gather up the crumbs under thy Table. But thou art the same Lord, whose property is always to have mercy: Grant us therefore, gracious Lord, so to eat the flesh of thy dear Son Jesus Christ, and to drink his blood, in these holy mysteries, that our sinful bodies may be made clean by his body, and our souls washed through his most precious blood, and that we may evermore dwell in him, and he in us. Amen.

(The above is the 1552/1559/1662 etc. version, with the omitted phrase inserted in bold italic. I place below the actual 1549 version, the ending of which was also rearranged in 1552, a rearrangement which I count as pure rhetorical gain):

We do not presume to come to this thy Table (O merciful Lord) trusting in our own righteousness, but in thy manifold and great mercies. We be not worthy so much as to gather up the crumbs under thy Table. But thou art the same Lord, whose property is always to have mercy: Grant us therefore, gracious Lord, so to eat the Flesh of thy dear Son Jesus Christ, and to drink his Blood, in these holy Mysteries, that we may continually dwell in him, and he in us, that our sinful bodies may be made clean by his Body, and our souls washed through his most precious Blood. Amen.

[Since sending my [Tighe's] comment about the phrasing of the Prayer of Humble Access around I have been informed by one involved in the preparation of the “Ordinariate Use” that “thought was taken” by those tasked with its preparation to restoring the phrase “in these holy Mysteries,” but that, in the end, they thought that the loss incurred by diminishing the familiarity of the prayer to those accustomed to its use would outweigh the gain from so altering it.]

Comments